Freemasonry

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Freemasonry, America's largest and oldest fraternity, has been an integral part of community life in the United States for over two hundred and fifty (250) years. Also known as the Craft, Freemasonry is an initiatic society which seeks to unite men of differing beliefs into a harmonious and productive community through the application of Masonic moral values and the practice of benevolence, intellectual development, and mutual respect.

History

The operative stonemasons who built the great cathedrals and castles had lodges in which they discussed trade affairs. They had simple initiation ceremonies and, as there were no City and Guilds certificates, dues cards or trade union membership cards, they adopted secret signs and words to demonstrate that they were trained masons when they moved from site to site. In the 1600s, these operative lodges began to accept non-operatives as “gentlemen masons”. Gradually these non-operatives took over the lodges and turned them from operative to ‘free and accepted’ or ‘speculative’ lodges..

Key Values

We encourage interaction and discourse among individuals of differing beliefs by promoting community service, civic responsibility, and civil debate. Freemasonry is a charitable, benevolent, and educational society.

  1. Brotherly Love: A true Freemason ought to show tolerance and respect for the opinions of others and be kind to and understanding of his fellow human beings.
  2. Relief: Freemasons are taught to practice charity, not only for their own, but also for the community at large.
  3. Truth: Freemasons are taught to search for truth, requiring high moral standards and aiming to achieve them in their own lives.

Vision & Mission

To unite men of different beliefs and cultures into one common society of friends and brothers into a harmonious and productive community through the application of Masonic moral values and the practice of benevolence, intellectual development, and mutual respect.

Through the improvement and strengthening of the character of the individual man. Freemasonry seeks to improve the community. Thus it impresses upon its members the principles of personal righteousness and personal responsibility, enlightens them as to those things which make for human welfare, and inspires them with that feeling of charity, or good will, toward all mankind which will move to translate principle and conviction into action.

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